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 Conference Agenda 

*Download the 2010 ATE Conference Program*
Low Res Version, PDF, 6 MB
High Res Version, PDF, 18 MB


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 27

10:00 am – 8:00 pm    
Conference Registration
West Conference Foyer

10:00 am – 7:30 pm     
Internet Cafe
Executive

1:00 – 5:00 pm           
Workshop A: Getting Started
Ticket required
Palladian

This workshop is recommended for all principal investigators, co-principal investigators and other team members involved in newly awarded projects and centers in FY10. Others who may find the workshop useful include new awardees in FY09 and other project personnel from prior years who have recently become involved in ATE projects and centers. The workshop will be divided into three parts: (1) ATE Program Issues. Topics to be covered include reporting requirements such as annual and final reports, working with NSF program officers, changes in project personnel or scope, data collection, FastLane and other reporting systems, use of Advisory Boards and National Visiting Committees, preparing project highlights for NSF and others, Institutional Review Boards (IRBs), and many other relevant topics. (2) Financial Management and Grant Management Issues. This section will focus on financial accounting issues and discuss in detail problems often seen in monitoring visits such as participant support, time and effort accounting, subawardees, record keeping, changes in scope, overload, and use of consultants. (3) Evaluation. This segment will address building in evaluation from the start of your project or center. The ATE program has an annual survey of all projects and centers that have been active for more than one year. Additional evaluation topics to be addressed include, but are not limited to, evaluation design, methods and instrumentation, resources for learning about productive evaluation, the roles of internal and external evaluators, and evaluation challenges. 

1:00 – 4:00 pm           
Workshop B: Experience How to Make Learning Real for Your Students
Ticket required
Congressional A

This workshop will provide participants with innovative proven practices in experiential learning that several ATE projects have successfully developed and implemented in their technology curricula.  Different types of experiential learning will be presented including internships, cooperative education, service learning, and problem based learning.  Participants will be introduced to curriculum materials that can be used to introduce experiential learning into technology programs including how to integrate experiential learning in technology programs using self-directed teams.  Finally, participants will learn specific evaluation tools that they can use in their own institutions for experiential learning initiatives.

1:00 – 5:00 pm        
Workshop C: Technical Education in Small and Rural Schools - Challenges and Opportunities
Ticket required
Congressional B

Rural and small community colleges face unique and important challenges when they seek to develop high tech programs. They often have low and fluctuating enrollment, possess limited faculty and IT capacity, and serve economically disadvantaged populations with workforce demands that are different from those in more urban settings. This workshop is recommended for faculty, staff and administrators from rural or small institutions who are working to start and/or sustain technical courses and programs. It may also be of value to urban or suburban colleges serving outlying rural areas.  Workshop speakers and follow-up discussions will cover some of the strengths small and rural schools can bring to bear on implementing high tech programs, the challenges they often encounter, and potential solutions. Speakers will share examples of successful programs and common pitfalls. The session will include break-out discussions about new ideas and recommendations, as well as a chance to initiate potential collaborations.

1:00 – 4:00 pm           
Workshop D: Improving Technician Education through E-Materials and Innovative Online Teaching Strategies
Ticket required
Diplomat

The cost of textbooks limits many students’ access to postsecondary technical education. One way to reduce the cost of textbooks is to offer them in ebook format. This eliminates the expense of production, inventory, and shipping. These savings, which may reduce the costs by 35–50%, can then be passed on to students. This workshop will explore formats, software, online delivery options, and costs associated with the conversion of print-based teaching materials to ebooks. Ebooks provide access to other web-based tools that can improve students’ Internet search skills, introduce contextual examples, and measure and track student progress. Workshop participants will be introduced to online interactive applications, explore ways to use those applications in their fields, and examine options for integrating ebook components and supplementary technology tools, such as remote labs, into interactive teaching practices.

1:00 – 4:00 pm           
Workshop E: Designing Practical and Useful Evaluations
Ticket required
Empire

An intellectual merit criterion for the ATE program is that the grant-level evaluations should provide useful information to the project and others.  This workshop is designed for PI-evaluator teams seeking to enhance the usefulness of their evaluations while keeping them practical and cost effective.  Evalua|t|e staff will facilitate hands-on activities in which participants clarify and solidify evaluation work plans and deliverables; establish or refine a logic model for their projects and use it to identify success indicators and performance standards; determine reporting needs, formats, and time lines; and identify strategies to develop, improve, and maintain productive working relationships between project evaluation staff. In addition, NSF program officers will present their expectations for evaluations of ATE grants. Other ATE PIs and evaluators will share best evaluation practices that participants can adopt to support project improvement. ATE PIs are encouraged to bring their evaluators to this session, along with project/evaluation planning materials, such as a project logic models, goals/objectives, and evaluation plans. 

3:30 – 6:00 pm           
Showcase I Set-up
Exhibit Hall

4:15 - 5:30 p.m.
Effective Project Leadership: Advice from Exemplars
Open Session
Ambassador

Achieving excellence in an ATE project should not be left to chance.  You know what you want to do, but have you really thought about all the administrative roadblocks to the smooth operation of your project?  More critically, how can you get the buy-in and assistance that you need from your faculty, administration, on-campus and off-campus partners?  This session features five senior ATE principal investigators reacting to real challenges in project management (managing people, managing funds, managing operations) and change leadership (building and sustaining support among key constituencies, anticipating and adjusting to changing operational conditions, and institutionalizing a project's activities within the core operations of host units).  Extensive time is built in for audience comment and discussion.  We will also discuss a new web site being constructed that will offer video segments with advice that senior PIs wish they had when they started their projects. Although targeted to new PIs, many senior PIs will find this a valuable discussion as well.

6:00 – 7:30 pm           
Opening Plenary Session:  Beating the Odds – The Critical Role of America’s Community Colleges in Preparing Students from All Backgrounds for STEM Careers
Regency Ballroom
Keynote Speaker:  Dr. Freeman A. Hrabrowski, III, President, University of Maryland-Baltimore County

Globally, rapid and dramatic technological and demographic changes present the nation with enormous challenges for preparing America’s STEM workforce for the new century.  The nation’s community and technical colleges will play an essential role in responding to these challenges, including preparing many more students from diverse backgrounds for STEM careers. What strategies and best practices can they use—working in partnership with business and industry, government, and our educational systems—to adapt to and embrace rapid change and ensure effective STEM workforce development throughout all segments of the population?  Answers to such questions will substantially influence the capabilities and effectiveness of the workforce, the productivity of our public and private sectors, and, ultimately, the nation’s global competitiveness in the first part of the 21st century.

7:30 – 9:45 pm         
Showcase I and Welcome Reception
Exhibit Hall

9:45 - 10:30 pm       
Showcase I Breakdown
Exhibit Hall

 

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 28

6:30 - 7:45 a.m.
Showcase II Set-Up
Exhibit Hall

7:00 am – 6:00 pm      
Conference Registration
West Conference Foyer

7:00 am – 6:00 pm      
Internet Cafe
Executive

8:00 am - 10:15 am
Showcase II and Continental Breakfast
Exhibit Hall

10:15 - 11:00 am
Showcase II Breakdown
Exhibit Hall

10:30 - 11:45 am
Concurrent Sessions

Session 1: The Entrepreneurial Technician - Educating the Innovative STEM Professional
Empire

Community and technical college graduates in STEM disciplines are not only expected to possess the technical skills that are required in our fast changing economic landscape, but also an understanding of the breadth of business operations and entrepreneurial behaviors that allow them to apply their technical skills in a more innovative and adaptive way.  This interactive and “hands-on” presentation will showcase two innovative approaches that employ active and collaborative learning to infuse principles of intra- and entrepreneurship into STEM curricula.  The session will also feature a representative from the National Association for Community College Entrepreneurship (NACCE) to discuss ways that community colleges can link their traditional role in workforce development with entrepreneurial development to advance economic growth and prosperity in their communities.

Session 2: Workforce Diversity - Reaching and Supporting Traditionally Underserved Students
Diplomat

Employers are recognizing that workforce diversity can give them a competitive edge in both local and global markets. Integrating workers from diverse backgrounds into an organization’s workforce provides a variety of perspectives, experiences, and ideas that can stimulate creativity and innovation. With an increasingly diverse U.S. population and the large number of retiring baby boomers, employers will be looking to hire workers from minority and other underrepresented groups more than ever.  As a result, colleges face the challenge of recruiting, supporting, and preparing this untapped pool of potential workers.  During this session, the panelists will discuss programs for recruiting students from traditionally underserved populations, and how they are helping these students to succeed in preparing them for a changing technical workforce.

Session 3: Conducting Research to Support Advanced Technological Education with Examples from the DECA Project
Ambassador

Many ATE projects and centers reported on the annual ATE evaluation survey that they are conducting research on aspects of technician education.  This session will feature brief reports on research being conducted under the Discovering the Educational Consequences of ATE (DECA) project.  Research results on tagging new curriculum materials for content, logistical requirements for implementation, and their impact on ATE projects and centers will be highlighted.  The remainder of the session will be dedicated to a facilitated discussion, with audience participation, to explore issues related to ATE research and how research can be made more useful to ATE PIs.

Session 4: Federal Agencies and STEM - Programs and Funding You Need to Know About
Palladian

Several federal agencies are focusing on community colleges to increase student access and success to educate workers in the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields.  A panel of federal agency representatives will discuss their STEM programs and priorities; address how these programs align with NSF’s Advanced Technological Education (ATE) program; and share information on community college funding opportunities. The session will include time to ask questions of the panelists.

12:00 - 1:45 pm 
Lunch Plenary Session: 21st Century Skills - From Industry to Education and Back
Regency Ballroom
Keynote Speaker: Charles Fadel, Global Education Research Lead, CISCO

In this presentation, we will explore how the 21st century skills movement was started by industry requirements that students graduate not only with traditional knowledge, but with skills such as critical thinking, creativity, communication, and collaboration.  A transformation in how to prepare students is now occurring in schools, community colleges, and universities on a global basis.  Learn the potential impact of the 21st century skills movement on the future of education and its importance in preparing U.S. workers for positions in the global economy.

2:00 – 5:00 pm          
Birds of a Feather Sessions

Agriculture, Environment, and Natural Resources  -
Ambassador

Biotechnology, Section 1 – Capitol

Biotechnology, Section 2 – Embassy

Chemical Processing and Refining Technology – Senate

Energy Production and Energy Efficiency - Empire

Engineering Technology, Section 1 – Congressional A

Engineering Technology, Section 2 – Congressional B

Geospatial Technologies - Calvert

Information and Communications Technologies - Hampton

Information Assurance, Secure Logistics and Forensics Technologies - Governors

Manufacturing Technologies - Palladian

Micro and Nanotechnologies - Diplomat

Research and Outreach/Learning and Evaluation - Cabinet

Teacher Preparation - Forum


3:00 - 3:45 pm
Student Showcase Set-Up
Exhibit Hall

3:45 - 5:00 pm
Student Showcase Networking Event
Students Only
Exhibit Hall

5:15 – 6:30 pm       
Student Showcase Session and Reception
Exhibit Hall

 

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 29

7:30 am –12:00 pm 
Conference Registration
West Conference Foyer

7:30 – 10:00 am     
Internet Cafe
Executive

7:30 – 8:45 am      
Continental Breakfast
Regency

7:30 - 8:45 am
Showcase III Set-Up
Exhibit Hall

7:30 – 8:45 am           
ATE Student/Alumni Recognition Breakfast
By Invitation Only
Hampton Ballroom

7:45 – 8:45 am       
Breakfast Roundtables
Ambassador Ballroom

9:00 – 10:15 am     
Plenary Session: The Art of Enlightened Self-Interest
Regency
Keynote Speaker: Ann Higdon, President and Founder, Improved Solutions for Urban Systems (ISUS)

How can we create greater individual and organizational impact by aligning societal, business, and government interests?  Can STEM programs be the breakthrough that blends education with workforce, community, and economic development?   It’s happening. 

10:15 am - 12:30 pm
Showcase III and Lunch
Exhibit Hall

12:30 – 1:15 pm     
Showcase III Breakdown

12:45 – 3:00 pm     
ATE Center Directors Meeting
ATE Center Staff Only
Palladian

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